Types of questions in Loquiz

March 8, 2012 - 5 minutes read

There are many ways to divide questions into groups. At large there are two types of questions in Loquiz.

  1. Questions about specific locations
  2. General questions

All the questions are asked in specified locations, so there is a location added to every questions. The difference is that to answer first type of questions you actually need to be on the spot and look around. This question can not be asked anywhere else.  Second type of the question can be asked anywhere and can be answered without being on the spot.

Location specific questions

What object, what color, how many, to which direction, how tall, how wide, looking like… and many more are the ways to build location specific questions.  Now the challenge here is that GPS always has an error. It is fair to expect that players arrive near but not to the exact point you expect them to be. It is advisable to start the location specific question with a introduction. Like “ find  four fish statues nearby.”

If the question is about something very small include additional clues to find the object.

Also in question attributes when creating the game make the point radius smaller (10 meters is usually ok). That takes people closer to what they actually should look for. However make sure your point is not too close to buildings, as otherwise you might find that the point ends up inside the house and is not accessible in the game.

Usually up to half of the questions in a game are location specific.

General questions

These are the questions that are not connected to surroundings. They have location, but they are not about location. There are many types of general questions. I will list some of them here.

  • General factual questions. These are something that anybody can find using online search. Factual questions would be like – How many hearts does an octopus have? You might not know it but you can easily find out.
  • Logic questions. These are the questions that you can not search for. You just need to figure out the answer. Like something out of the IQ test.  Just be aware that when people are orienteering there  is a lot less brain capacity available to solve logic puzzles.  It is easy to make those too tough.  They are nice touch though as players are not able to look them up from search or from surroundings.
  • Specific or personal questions. These are the questions that are usually about the group or individuals playing. So you might have a game where all or majority of the questions are about birthday child. Or you could have the game with company values in it. Or you could make the game with colleagues so that everybody can add one question about themselves, building a game where you actually learn about you coworkers.
  • Themed questions. Sometimes there is a need to build a game that is focused on one theme. For example school groups make games that are about specific book pupils were supposed to read. Or about 5th grade physics.  Hard to google but fun to check your knowledge.
  • Nonsense questions. You could actually put in a question and answers that have no sense whatsoever. So the outcome is pure luck. One or two make the game more lively. More than that and you will have angry players.

For both of these categories you can ofcourse use all the question types available in Loquiz – multiple choice, multiple answers, text, number, photo questions and “no-answers” aka stories.

Just remember that orienteering demands a fair bit of processing power from the brain.  Do not overcomplicate.

 

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