5 tips for creating an outdoor team building game with Loquiz

September 23, 2015 - 5 minutes read

People use Loquiz to create different outdoor team building games. But no matter what the event is about, some questions about making better games are often asked from us. So here are 5 suggestions and tips about constructing a game.

1 Players love questions that make them notice surroundings or do something with the whole team. 

Location based questions are something that requires you to look at details in the environment (details on a sculpture, a tree, building, information board ect.) which  are otherwise missed in the everyday hustle.
They also contain tasks that encourage communication between team members. These types of questions are the hardest to create. A few examples:
“Take a picture that shows 8 hands and 13 fingers.”
“Time for a little change! Pass the device on to the best singer on your team and let him/her guide your team to the next point!”
(you can find these also in the Question Library)

2 Radius, which opens up questions should be 10 -15 meters minimum.
You can set a radius for location based questions while creating a game and placing question triggers on the map, but remember to keep it larger than 10 meters. GPS accuracy is almost never accurate to 1m and your players will never reach the tiny dot to open up the question.  Read more about GPS accuracy.
Larger, 100 meter radii on the other hand are fun- while creating seek and avoid type “minefields” or “on the road” bus or boat ride games. Large radius questions are also handy when you run a clue game without a map and people have to stumble upon a question.

3 Intro and hint are two separate useful features.
You can set your own intros and hints while creating a question.
Intros are shown before players reach a location. Teams can click through all triggers on a map and decide in a Rogain game which locations they will visit based on intros. They can also decide what clues to solve in a clue-game by an intro.

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For example, a team might be strong in mathematics and put priority on visiting locations/answering questions with a pre-clue saying “A calculation task awaits you!”pre-clue

Hints are something that players can open when they are already in the location, have opened the question, and are completely stuck. For riddles and complex questions, hints can ease the trouble. You can limit how many hints within a game teams can use on the game “configure” page.hint

4 How many tasks/questions should there be in each game? How long does it take to answer them? How many km or miles?
When we started with Loquiz, the standard was to have 30 questions in an 1,5 hour Rogain game and 50 questions in Strategy game of the same duration. The distance between triggers would be about 80-100 meters. Our thinking was that the best game duration would be about 1,5 hours. This number came from the belief that a person can stay active for approximately that long and still enjoy the game.
Now when we see how instructors create their own awesome games, the view is not so clear anymore. While we still think the overall rule of thumb is still valid, we have seen really cool game concepts where the game lasts several hours and groups travel more than 10 kilometers (or 7 miles  :).  The biggest factor to game length is your customer. And you know what they wish for way better than we do.

5 It is ok to use “snap a photo”, trivia, riddles, puzzles and team tasks as mix.
Sometimes people are used to making full photohunt games. However, different question types and tasks add variety to the game as well as allow for some easy questions. Knowing something instantly fires up the joy to play.

We hope this helps you to fine tune your questions and games. Let us know in the comments below what other features are important  to notice while creating a game!

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